Core Mechanic

To make a Test, follow these steps.

  • Determine the Skill or Characteristic being tested. Each Test identifies one Characteristic or a Skill (which is a Characteristic modified by circumstances) to be Tested.
  • Once the Skill or Characteristic is identified, take the value of the Skill or Characteristic. This is a number between 1 and 99. Once you have that number, identify any modifiers that may affect the Test, either positive or negative. Easier Tests may grant bonuses (such as +10 or
    +20) to the Skill or Characteristic being Tested for the duration of the Test, while more difficult Tests may impose penalties (such as –10 or –20). In addition, actions and environmental conditions may impose further modifiers. Aiming a gun before firing it may grant a bonus to a
    Ballistic Skill Test, while running through deep snow may impose a penalty to an Athletics Test.
  • Add all the modifi ers together. Positive and negative modifiers may negate each other. Once all modifiers have been combined, the character should be left with a final number. This number may be greater than 100, or less than zero, but typically falls between 1 and 99.
  • Make a percentile roll (d100).
  • If the result of the percentile roll is less than or equal to the Skill or Characteristic being tested, after all modifiers are applied, then the test succeeds.
  • If the result of the percentile roll is greater than the Skill or Characteristic being tested, after all modifiers are applied, then the test fails.
  • Note, that if the result of the percentile roll is a natural “1,” the Test succeeds, even if the total modifiers made the Skill or Characteristic less than 1. Likewise, if the result is a
    natural “100” then the Test fails, even if the total modifiers made the Skill or Characteristic greater than 100.

DEGREES OF SUCCESS AND FAILURE

During a BLACK CRUSADE game, knowing whether a test has succeeded or failed is typically sufficient. There are times, however, when it is helpful to know just how well a character has succeeded at a given task, or just how badly he has failed. This is of particular importance with social skills, such as Charm and Inquiry, as well as during some combat situations such as when firing an automatic weapon. Measuring a character’s Degrees of Success or Failure is a rather straightforward process. Once the percentage roll for the test is made, compare the outcome of the roll with the modified Characteristic score. If the roll is lower than the Characteristic, the character has gained one Degree of Success. Furthermore, very 10 points by which the test succeeds grants yet another Degree of Success. Conversely, if the roll is higher than the Characteristic, the character has gained one Degree of Failure, and gains an additional Degree of Failure for every additional 10 points rolled over the Characteristic.

Core Mechanic

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